Fix OK

FixOK FNL ColorThe Oklahoma Alliance for Animals (OAA) is committed to reducing the state’s tragic and costly pet overpopulation crisis.

In Oklahoma, tens of thousands dogs and cats are euthanized every year simply because they are homeless. Their lives were created by irresponsible people who did not spay and neuter their dogs and cats. These innocent animals pay the cost with their lives and taxpayers pay the cost with tax dollars that could (and should) be used to meet other needs. All because of irresponsible pet owners who do not spay and neuter.

It’s time to FIX OK. Spay and neuter. Be a responsible pet owner. Please be part of the solution, not part of the problem. Stop backyard breeding. Your pet does NOT need to have any single litters . . . because that single litter will exponentially turn into hundreds of homeless animals in just a year. Sterilizing a pet improves their health and increases their lifespan. It’s the ONLY responsible choice.

Fix OK program

Fix OK, a program of the Oklahoma Alliance for Animals, is a grassroots effort to stop Oklahoma’s horrific and costly pet overpopulation problem. Oklahoma has a heartbreaking and expensive pet overpopulation crisis that consumes city finances and resources with the needless killing of healthy animals who are homeless, all caused by the irresponsible behavior of pet owners who fail to spay and neuter their pets. It happens every day in Oklahoma.

Frankly, taxpayers are unfairly paying for irresponsible pet owners and backyard breeders. And innocent animals are paying with their lives. It’s time for pet owners to step up and be responsible.

Fix OK model 2

Fix OK model

Fix OK proposes an effective economic model designed to reduce the homeless pet population by saving innocent lives while also reducing the burden on taxpayers struggling to financially to pick up the tab for irresponsible pet owners. Click here for OAA’s presentation about Solving Tulsa’s Pet Overpopulation Crisis.

Step 1: Understand there is a problem that is horrific, costly, and totally solvable

Take Tulsa County, for example. The City of Tulsa has a city ordinance that requires pet owners to spay and neuter their dogs and cats or face a $200 fine. Between 2009 and 2014, the City of Tulsa euthanized nearly 40,000 dogs and cats, an average of 6,543 per year.  That is nearly 60% of the dogs and cats that entered the city shelter during that time. Just one unaltered male and female dog or cat and their litters can result in thousands of unwanted and homeless animals in just a couple of years. 

Step 2: Fix your pet!

Fixing Ok begins with you. There’s nothing cooler than ending pet overpopulation, but there are other reasons you should spay and neuter for your pets (hint: it greatly reduces their risk of cancer and can solve some behavior issues). Click here to learn more about fixing your pet. Then check out the list of low-cost spay/neuter clinics available in your area. If you need help contact OAA.

Step 3: Make low-cost spay/neuter clinics available to pet owners.

Supported by licensed veterinarians, low-cost spay/neuter clinics may be organized and sponsored by communities, animal welfare groups, veterinarians, pet product manufacturers, etc. A current list of clinics is posted here and on the Fix OK Facebook page. Please share those announcements to let others know where they can have their pets sterilized by licensed veterinarians.

Step 4: Pass strict spay/neuter laws in every community and county in Oklahoma.

Many communities in Oklahoma require pet owners to spay and neuter their dogs and cats – or risk hefty fines. EVERY city, town, and county needs these laws to help Fix OK. Is your community a responsible community that requires spay and neuter? Is your community doing its part to solve the pet overpopulation crisis by requiring sterilization? If not, why? Contact your city officials to pass spay/neuter laws – and enforce them! Talk with them about why this is important. Tell them about the economic benefits that will result. Turn the expense of euthanasia into a revenue generator (fines) for the community that will help FIX OK. This will help save the lives of thousands of homeless pets.

While a growing number of communities require spay/neuter by law (meaning breeding dogs and cats is not legal in those communities), the State of Oklahoma also has laws that deal with breeding. One law is the commercial breeders license that is required of breeders with 11 or more intact females. To report violations, complaints can be filed with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture. Please use this form. Note that the state has a limited number of investigators but using the form is the fastest way to report a concern.

Step 5: Enforce spay/neuter laws and fine irresponsible pet owners.

Communities must prioritize and strictly enforce spay/neuter laws. There needs to be a significant shift in priorities from euthanizing animals to enforcing spay/neuter laws, shifting the focus from an expense to a revenue generator! Fines paid by ticketed irresponsible pet owners can be used to help pay for the euthanasia of the innocent lives they create. Encourage people to spay and neuter their pets. Share with them information about low-cost clinics. If your city has a spay/neuter ordinance and they refuse to sterilize their pets, report this anonymously and confidentially.

Step 6: Share information about the health and economic benefits of sterilizing pets.

Share information about how an animal improves their health and increases their lifespan. Offer information about the health issues and where clinics are available. For those who refuse to sterilize their pets, report them. It’s that important. Help is available.

Step 7: Support nonprofits fighting pet overpopulation.

Support research that works to find kind, effective, and less expensive methods to sterilize dogs and cats. Many rescues host spay/neuter clinics and their events are posted on the Fix OK Facebook pageSpay Ok also offers low-cost year-round spay/neuter clinics in north Tulsa and Bixby.

Step 8: Learn more about how to Fix your community. 

Click here for more information by community.